Scottish agates: In conversation

What is an agate? How are they formed? And what’s it like running a Twitter account dedicated to them? Our Digital Media Content Manager Russell Dornan was after answers to these questions and more.

Ah, when social media and geology collide! One of my favourite things is Twitter accounts dedicated to particularly niche subjects, especially when it involves museums. From MuseumBums to MuseumLadders, there’s a lot of cheeky fun to be had.

So imagine the joy I get from following ScottishAgates, an account solely dedicated to sharing one Scottish agate specimen from National Museums Scotland’s mineral collections every day. If you’re not following it are you even on Twitter?

An orange and white agate.
Some of the agates Emily has been sharing from @ScottishAgates on Twitter.

A peach and yellow and blue agate that resembles a sunset from a beach.
Some of the agates Emily has been sharing from @ScottishAgates on Twitter.
A brown and white agate in a swirly pattern.
Some of the agates Emily has been sharing from @ScottishAgates on Twitter.
An orange and white agate.
Some of the agates Emily has been sharing from @ScottishAgates on Twitter.

It’s run by Emily Brown, our Earth Systems Assistant Curator. I sat down with Emily the other week to talk all about her Twitter project. Take a listen!

Head to Twitter to check it out and listen to our conversation to hear the inspiration behind the account, find out more about agates, explore how our Scottish agate collection came to be and discover other must-follow niche Twitter accounts you might be missing out on.

The “spotty” agate Emily references in the conversation, one of her favourites. Not really an agate, it’s a slice of volcanic rock with lots of tiny agates in it.
An agate shaped like a flame.
Another favourite, this is the “little flame” agate mentioned by Emily.

The Scottish Geology Festival 2021 brings you a packed programme of activities from Stranraer to Shetland that will showcase and celebrate Scotland’s geology.

- Posted

Add your comments

1 Comment

Related posts

Beasts before us

Mammal diversity at the time of the dinosaurs is becoming better understood thanks to ongoing research. Central to this, Scotland…